Article

Coping skills and exposure therapy in panic disorder and agoraphobia: latest advances and future directions.

Department of Psychology, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 72505, USA.
Behavior therapy (Impact Factor: 2.85). 06/2012; 43(2):271-84. DOI: 10.1016/j.beth.2011.08.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Although cognitive-behavioral treatments for panic disorder have demonstrated efficacy, a considerable number of patients terminate treatment prematurely or remain symtpomatic. Cognitive and biobehavioral coping skills are taught to improve exposure therapy outcomes but evidence for an additive effect is largely lacking. Current methodologies used to study the augmenting effects of coping skills test the degree to which the delivery of coping skills enhances outcomes. However, they do not assess the degree to which acquisition of coping skills and their application during exposure therapy augment outcomes. We examine the extant evidence on the role of traditional coping skills in augmenting exposure for panic disorder, discuss the limitations of existing research, and offer recommendations for methodological advances.

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