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Survey of heavy metals in the catfish Synodontis clarias.

International Journal of Environmental Sience and Technology, 01/2007; 4(1):93-97.
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    ABSTRACT: This article may be used for research, teaching, and private study purposes. Any substantial or systematic reproduction, redistribution, reselling, loan, sub-licensing, systematic supply, or distribution in any form to anyone is expressly forbidden. The publisher does not give any warranty express or implied or make any representation that the contents will be complete or accurate or up to date. The accuracy of any instructions, formulae, and drug doses should be independently verified with primary sources. The publisher shall not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand, or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever caused arising directly or indirectly in connection with or arising out of the use of this material.
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    ABSTRACT: Water samples from the Anambra River were taken from five distinct locations that displayed differential environmental stress to evaluate freshwater pollution. The physico-chemical characteristics of the river were conducted. The distribution and occurrence of heavy metals, which may affect human health and possibly induce aquatic damage, were investigated in the water column, adopting standard ecological and chemical techniques. The experimental approach was conducted under 2x5 factorial in a completely randomized block design using equal replicates to test the effects of season (rainy and dry) and location on the pollution parametric measurements, together with their interactions on heavy metal concentrations. Public survey on the use and treatment of water from the ecologically stressed river was investigated with questionnaire. Variations occurred between physico-chemical parameters and heavy metal concentrations of water samples from different locations in both rainy and dry seasons. Season by location interaction affected the heavy metal concentrations adversely, especially with regard to zinc. Likert scaling procedure further showed significant use and non-treatment of water from the river, posing a potential health threat to the dependent human population. Being obvious from the results that freshwater pollution could also be traceable to effluent/municipal wastewater discharged from industries and homes, there is need to respond appropriately to sustain the aquatic resources and avert possible human disease tragedies. In addition, Ackerman’s principles of water management for people and environment should be followed.
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of Nelumbo nucifera and Aegle marmelos on common carp exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of combined heavy metals (5 ppm) under laboratory conditions. The fish were treated with Nelumbo nucifera (500 mg/kg bwt) and Aegle marmelos (500 mg/kgbwt) for 30 days as a dietary supplement. The blood biochemical parameters of the fish were evaluated by analyzing the level of red blood cells (RBC), packed cell volume (PCV), hemoglobin concentration, glucose, cholesterol, iron and copper. The findings of the present investigation showed significant increase in hemoglobin (p<0.001), RBC (p<0.01) and PCV (p<0.01) of herbal drug-treated groups compared with metal-exposed fish. Conversely, glucose and cholesterol level in blood of common carp showed significant reduction compared with heavy-metal-exposed groups. All the values measured in Nelumbo nucifera and Aegle marmelos treated fish were restored comparably to control fish. Our results confirmed that Nelumbo nucifera and Aegle marmelos provide a detoxification mechanism for heavy metals in common carp.
    Interdisciplinary toxicology 12/2010; 3(4):127-31.