Article

Magnetic resonance metabolic imaging of glioma.

Department of Neurosurgery, Hôpital de la Timone, APHM, 13005 Marseille, France.
Science translational medicine (Impact Factor: 14.41). 01/2012; 4(116):116ps1. DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3003591
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT 2-Hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) is a potential oncometabolite involved in gliomagenesis that has been identified as an aberrant product of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutated glial tumors. Recent genomics studies have shown that heterozygous mutation of IDH genes 1 and 2, present in up to 86% of grade II gliomas, is associated with a favorable outcome. Two reports in this issue describe both ex vivo and in vivo methods that could noninvasively detect the presence of 2-HG in glioma patients. This approach could have valuable implications for diagnosis, prognosis, and stratification of brain tumors, as well as for monitoring of treatment in glioma patients.

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