Article

Shortening Medical Training by 30%

Office of the Provost and Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association (Impact Factor: 30.39). 03/2012; 307(11):1143-4. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2012.292
Source: PubMed
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