Article

A high-density simple sequence repeat and single nucleotide polymorphism genetic map of the tetraploid cotton genome.

G3-Genes Genomes Genetics (Impact Factor: 1.79). 01/2012; 2(1):43-58. DOI: 10.1534/g3.111.001552
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Genetic linkage maps play fundamental roles in understanding genome structure, explaining genome formation events during evolution, and discovering the genetic bases of important traits. A high-density cotton (Gossypium spp.) genetic map was developed using representative sets of simple sequence repeat (SSR) and the first public set of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers to genotype 186 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from an interspecific cross between Gossypium hirsutum L. (TM-1) and G. barbadense L. (3-79). The genetic map comprised 2072 loci (1825 SSRs and 247 SNPs) and covered 3380 centiMorgan (cM) of the cotton genome (AD) with an average marker interval of 1.63 cM. The allotetraploid cotton genome produced equivalent recombination frequencies in its two subgenomes (At and Dt). Of the 2072 loci, 1138 (54.9%) were mapped to 13 At-subgenome chromosomes, covering 1726.8 cM (51.1%), and 934 (45.1%) mapped to 13 Dt-subgenome chromosomes, covering 1653.1 cM (48.9%). The genetically smallest homeologous chromosome pair was Chr. 04 (A04) and 22 (D04), and the largest was Chr. 05 (A05) and 19 (D05). Duplicate loci between and within homeologous chromosomes were identified that facilitate investigations of chromosome translocations. The map augments evidence of reciprocal rearrangement between ancestral forms of Chr. 02 and 03 versus segmental homeologs 14 and 17 as centromeric regions show homeologous between Chr. 02 (A02) and 17 (D02), as well as between Chr. 03 (A03) and 14 (D03). This research represents an important foundation for studies on polyploid cottons, including germplasm characterization, gene discovery, and genome sequence assembly.

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