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Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium Guidelines for HLA-B Genotype and Abacavir Dosing: 2014 Update

Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.
Clinical Pharmacology &#38 Therapeutics (Impact Factor: 7.39). 02/2012; 91(4):734-8. DOI: 10.1038/clpt.2011.355
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Human leukocyte antigen B (HLA-B) is responsible for presenting peptides to immune cells and plays a critical role in normal immune recognition of pathogens. A variant allele, HLA-B*57:01, is associated with increased risk of a hypersensitivity reaction to the anti-HIV drug abacavir. In the absence of genetic prescreening, hypersensitivity affects ~6% of patients and can be life-threatening with repeated dosing. We provide recommendations (updated periodically at http://www.pharmkgb.org) for the use of abacavir based on HLA-B genotype.

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