Translational Research of Photodynamic Therapy with Acridine Orange which Targets Cancer Acidity

Department of Molecular Cell Physiology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kawaramachi Hirokoji Kajiicho 465, Kamigyo-ku Kyoto 602-8566, Japan.
Current pharmaceutical design (Impact Factor: 3.45). 02/2012; 18(10):1414-20. DOI: 10.2174/138161212799504812
Source: PubMed


During the past 20 years, we have found that acridine orange (AO) selectively accumulates in musculoskeletal sarcomas in vivo or exerts selective cytocidal effects against sarcoma cells in vitro after illumination of the tumor cells with visible light or irradiation of the cells with low-dose X-rays. Based on the data obtained from basic research, we have employed reduction surgery followed by photo- or radiodynamic therapy using AO (AO-PDT & RDT) in 71 patients with musculoskeletal sarcomas, in an attempt to maintain excellent limb function in the patients. We have obtained good local control rates and remarkably better limb functions with this approach as compared to the results obtained with the conventional wide resection surgery. Our basic research demonstrated that AO accumulates densely in intracellular acidic vesicles, especially lysosomes, in an acidity-dependent manner. In cancer cells that proliferate under hypoxic conditions or with Warburg's effect, active glycolysis produces an enormous number of protons, which are released by the cells via proton pumps into the extracellular fluid or lysosomes to maintain a neutral pH of the cytosolic fluid. Cancer cells contain many strongly acidic lysosomes of large sizes; therefore, AO shows marked and prolonged accumulation in the acidic lysosomes of cancer cells. Photon energy excites the AO resulting in the production of activated oxygen species, which oxidize the fatty acids of the lysosomal membrane, resulting in the leakage of lysosomal enzymes and protons, followed by apoptosis of the cancer cells. Based on these observations, we conclude that AO-PDT & RDT target acidic vesicles, especially the lysosomes, in cancer cells, to exhibit selective anti-cancer cell activity. Therefore, it is suggested that AO excited by photon energy has excellent potential as an anticancer "Magic Bullet".

371 Reads
  • Source
    09/2014; DOI:10.7759/cureus.204
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most frequent soft tissue sarcoma in children and adolescents, with a high rate of relapse that dramatically affects the clinical outcome. Multiagent chemotherapy, in combination with surgery and/or radiation therapy, is the treatment of choice. However, the relapse rate is disappointingly high and identification of new therapeutic tools is urgently needed. Under this respect, the selective block of key features of cancer stem cells (CSC) appears particularly promising. In this study, we isolated rhabdomyosarcoma CSC with stem-like features (high expression of NANOG and OCT3/4, self-renewal ability, multipotency). Rhabdomyosarcoma CSC showed higher invasive ability and a reduced cytotoxicity to doxorubicin in comparison to native cells, through a mechanism unrelated to the classical multidrug resistance process. This was dependent on a high level of lysosome acidity mediated by a high expression of vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase). Since it was not associated with other paediatric cancers, like Ewing's sarcoma and neuroblastoma, V-ATPase higher expression in CSC was rhabdomyosarcoma specific. Inhibition of lysosomal acidification by the V-ATPase inhibitor omeprazole, or by specific siRNA silencing, significantly enhanced doxorubicin cytoxicity. Unexpectedly, lysosomal targeting also blocked cell growth and reduced the invasive potential of rhabdomyosarcoma CSC, even at very low doses of omeprazole (10 and 50 ┬ÁM, respectively). Based on these observations, we propose lysosome acidity as a valuable target to enhance chemosensitivity of rhabdomyosarcoma CSC, and suggest the use of anti-V-ATPase agents in combination with standard regimens as a promising tool for the eradication of minimal residual disease or the prevention of metastatic disease.
    PLoS ONE 10/2014; 9(10):e110340. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0110340 · 3.23 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Much effort is currently devoted to developing patient-specific cancer therapy based on molecular characterization of tumors. In particular, this approach seeks to identify driver mutations that can be blocked through small molecular inhibitors. However, this approach is limited by extensive intratumoral genetic heterogeneity, and, not surprisingly, even dramatic initial responses are typically of limited duration as resistant tumor clones rapidly emerge and proliferate. We propose an alternative approach based on observations that while tumor evolution produces genetic divergence, it is also associated with striking phenotypic convergence that loosely correspond to the well-known cancer "hallmarks". These convergent properties can be described as driver phenotypes and may be more consistently and robustly expressed than genetic targets. To this purpose, it is necessary to identify strategies that are critical for cancer progression and metastases, and it is likely that these driver phenotypes will be closely related to cancer "hallmarks". It appears that an antiacidic approach, by targetting a driver phenotype in tumors, may be thought as a future strategy against tumors in either preventing the occurrence of cancer or treating tumor patients with multiple aims, including the improvement of efficacy of existing therapies, possibly reducing their systemic side effects, and controlling tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. This may be achieved with existing molecules such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and buffers such as sodium bicarbonate, citrate, or TRIS.
    Cancer and metastasis reviews 11/2014; 33(4). DOI:10.1007/s10555-014-9531-3 · 7.23 Impact Factor