Article

Marked reduction of soluble superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with recent-onset schizophrenia.

Department of Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
Molecular Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 15.15). 02/2012; DOI: 10.1038/mp.2012.6
Source: PubMed
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