Article

Cyr61 is a potential prognostic marker for prostate cancer.

Department of Urology, the James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.
Asian Journal of Andrology (Impact Factor: 2.53). 02/2012; 14(3):405-8. DOI: 10.1038/aja.2011.149
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (Cyr61) is an extracellular matrix protein involved in the transduction of growth factor and hormone signaling that is frequently altered in expression in several types of cancers. In prostate cancer (PCa), Cyr61 is highly expressed in organ-confined disease. Further, Cyr61 expression levels are associated with a lower risk of disease recurrence, and can be quantitatively measured in the serum. Considered together, these results indicate that Cyr61 is a potential and clinically useful tissue, as well as serum-based biomarker for differentiating lethal and non-lethal PCa.

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