Article

γ-Spectroscopy measurement of natural radioactivity and assessment of radiation hazard indices in soil samples from oil fields environment of Delta State, Nigeria.

Department of Physics, Federal University of Petroleum Resources, Effurun, Nigeria.
Journal of Environmental Radioactivity (Impact Factor: 3.67). 02/2012; 109:64-70. DOI: 10.1016/j.jenvrad.2011.10.012
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The analysis of naturally occurring radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) has been carried out in soil samples collected from oil and gas field environment of Delta state, using gamma spectroscopy operated on a Canberra vertical high purity 2″×2″ NaI(TI) detector. The activity concentration of the samples ranges from 19.2 ± 5.6Bqkg(-1) to 94.2 ± 7.7Bqkg(-1) with mean value of 41.0 ± 5.0Bqkg(-1) for (226)Ra, 17.1 ± 3.0Bqkg(-1) to 47.5 ± 5.3Bqkg(-1) with mean value of 29.7 ± 4Bqkg(-1) for (232)Th and 107.0 ± 10.2Bqkg(-1) to 712.4 ± 38.9Bqkg(-1) with a mean value of 412.5 ± 20.0Bqkg(-1) for (40)K. These values obtained are well within the world range and values reported elsewhere in other countries, but are little above some countries reported average values and some part of Nigeria. The study also examined some radiation hazard indices, the mean values obtained are, 98.5 ± 12.3Bq.kg(-1), 0.8Bqkg(-1), 54.6ηGyh(-1), 0.07μSvy(-1), 0.3 and 0.4 for Radium equivalent activity (Ra(eq)), Representative level index (Iγ), Absorbed Dose rates (D), Annual Effective Dose Rates (E(ff) Dose), External Hazard Index (H(ex)) and Internal Hazard Index (H(in)) respectively. These calculated hazard indices to estimate the potential radiological health risk in soil and the dose rate associated with it are well below their permissible limit. The soil and sediments from the study area provide no excessive exposures for inhabitants and can be use as construction materials without posing any immediate radiological threat to the public. However, oil workers in the fields and host communities are cautioned against excess exposure to avoid future accumulative dose of these radiations from sludge and sediment of this area.

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    ABSTRACT: Oil mineral leases (30, 58 and 61) in Delta and River States are the major oil blocks in the oil and gas rich Niger Delta region of Nigeria that is characterized by environmental degradation from oil and gas activities. This research work presents an analytical approach on natural radioactivity assessment in soil and sediment in 15 oil fields of these OMLs. Concentrations of natural radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) were determined using gamma spectroscopy. The mean activity concentration of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K for OML30 is 40.2 ± 5.1, 29.9 ± 4.2 and 361.5 ± 20.0 Bq kg−1, respectively; the corresponding values obtained for OML58 is 20.9 ± 2.8, 19.4 ± 2.5 and 260.0 ± 14.1 Bq kg−1, respectively. While the mean activity concentration of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K for OML61 is 29.3 ± 3.5, 21.6 ± 2.6 and 262.1 ± 14.6 Bq kg−1, respectively. These values obtained show enhanced NORMs, but are well within the world range and values reported in some regions and countries of the world, and are slightly above control values, values obtained in Southwestern region of Nigeria and some countries reported average values. The study also examined some radiation hazard indices, the mean values obtained are 86.6 ± 9.3 Bq kg−1, 0.6 Bq kg−1, 40.8 ηGy h−1, 0.05 μSv y−1, 0.2 and 0.3 for radium equivalent activity (Raeq), representative level index (Iγ), absorbed dose rates (D), annual effective dose rates (E ff dose), external hazard index (H ex) and internal hazard index (H in), respectively. These calculated hazard indices to estimate the potential radiological health risk in soil and sediment are well below their permissible limits. The soil and sediments from the study area provide no excessive exposures for the inhabitants and can be used as construction materials without posing any radiological threat or harm to the public users. However, oil-field workers and host community residents are cautioned against excess exposure to avoid future accumulative dose of these radiations from sludge and sediment of this area.
    Environmental earth sciences · 1.45 Impact Factor