Article

Dealing with problematic eating behaviour. The effects of a mindfulness-based intervention on eating behaviour, food cravings, dichotomous thinking and body image concern.

Maastricht University, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Clinical and Psychological Science, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.
Appetite (Impact Factor: 2.54). 01/2012; 58(3):847-51. DOI:10.1016/j.appet.2012.01.009
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This study explored the efficacy of a mindfulness-based intervention for problematic eating behavior. A non-clinical sample of 26 women with disordered eating behavior was randomly assigned to an 8-week MBCT-based eating intervention or a waiting list control group. Data were collected at baseline and after 8 weeks. Compared to controls, participants in the mindfulness intervention showed significantly greater decreases in food cravings, dichotomous thinking, body image concern, emotional eating and external eating. These findings suggest that mindfulness practice can be an effective way to reduce factors that are associated with problematic eating behaviour.

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