Article

Large-scale mapping of human protein interactome using structural complexes

National Center for Biotechnology Information, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20894, USA.
EMBO Reports (Impact Factor: 7.86). 03/2012; 13(3):266-71. DOI: 10.1038/embor.2011.261
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Although the identification of protein interactions by high-throughput (HTP) methods progresses at a fast pace, 'interactome' data sets still suffer from high rates of false positives and low coverage. To map the human protein interactome, we describe a new framework that uses experimental evidence on structural complexes, the atomic details of binding interfaces and evolutionary conservation. The structurally inferred interaction network is highly modular and more functionally coherent compared with experimental interaction networks derived from multiple literature citations. Moreover, structurally inferred and high-confidence HTP networks complement each other well, allowing us to construct a merged network to generate testable hypotheses and provide valuable experimental leads.

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Available from: Anna R Panchenko, Aug 31, 2015
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