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Development of a model to aid NIRS data interpretation: results from a hypercapnia study in healthy adults.

Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Malet Place Engineering Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK.
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (Impact Factor: 2.01). 01/2012; 737:293-300. DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4614-1566-4_43
Source: PubMed
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