Article

Smartphone-centred wearable sensors network for monitoring patients with bipolar disorder.

Networking Laboratory, Department of Innovative Technolgies, Institute of Information Systems and Netwrking, University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland, 6928 Manno, Switzerland.
Conference proceedings: ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference 08/2011; 2011:3644-7. DOI:10.1109/IEMBS.2011.6090613 In proceeding of: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society,EMBC, 2011 Annual International Conference of the IEEE
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Bipolar Disorder is a severe form of mental illness. It is characterized by alternated episodes of mania and depression, and it is treated typically with a combination of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. Recognizing early warning signs of upcoming phases of mania or depression would be of great help for a personalized medical treatment. Unfortunately, this is a difficult task to be performed for both patient and doctors. In this paper we present the MONARCA wearable system, which is meant for recognizing early warning signs and predict maniac or depressive episodes. The system is a smartphone-centred and minimally invasive wearable sensors network that is being developing in the framework of the MONARCA European project.

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