Article

Outcomes and Bleb-Related Complications of Trabeculectomy

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Ophthalmology (Impact Factor: 6.17). 01/2012; 119(4):712-22. DOI: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2011.09.049
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To determine rates of success and complications of trabeculectomy surgery.
Case series.
Consecutive patients undergoing trabeculectomy by 2 surgeons between May 2000 and October 2008.
By using the Wilmer Institute's billing database, we identified all patients at least 12 years of age coded as having undergone trabeculectomy between May 2000 and October 2008 by 1 of 2 glaucoma surgeons and whose surgery was not combined with another operation. From the chart, we abstracted demographic information on the patients and clinical characteristics of the eyes. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method and Cox proportional hazard models were used to look at success rates and characteristics associated with inadequate intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction. Complications were tabulated.
(1) Success rate of trabeculectomy, as determined by the achievement of each of 4 different IOP goals, with or without IOP-lowering medications; and (2) incidence of surgical complications.
During the study period, 797 eyes of 634 persons underwent trabeculectomy without concurrent surgery. The success rates 4 years after surgery, with or without the use of IOP-lowering eye drops, were 70%, 72%, 60%, and 44%, for achievement of target IOP, ≤18 mmHg and ≥20% IOP reduction, ≤15 mmHg and ≥25% reduction, and ≤12 mmHg and ≥30% reduction, respectively. Increased chance of success was associated with European-derived race; use of mitomycin C (MMC); higher concentrations of MMC, when used; and higher preoperative IOP. Age and previous intraocular surgery were not associated with surgical success. Complications included worsening lens opacity in 242 of 443 phakic eyes (55%), loss of ≥3 lines of acuity (Snellen) in 161 eyes (21%), surgery for bleb-related problems in 70 eyes (8.8%), and infection occurring >6 weeks after surgery in 27 eyes (3.4%). A total of 101 eyes of 94 patients had at least 1 subsequent operation for inadequate IOP control.
Trabeculectomy surgery performed by 2 experienced glaucoma specialists achieved target IOP at 4 years in 70% of those operated and was associated with progressive cataract and small risks of bleb-related complications. These results are comparable to those reported in smaller series.

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