Article

The congenital diaphragmatic hernia composite prognostic index correlates with survival in left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia

The Fetal Care Center of Cincinnati, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45267, USA.
Journal of Pediatric Surgery (Impact Factor: 1.31). 01/2012; 47(1):57-62. DOI: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2011.10.020
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We developed the congenital diaphragmatic hernia congenital prognostic index (CDH-CPI) to incorporate all known prognostic variables into a single composite index to improve prognostic accuracy. The purpose of this study is to examine the ability of the CDH-CPI to predict survival in patients with left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia and to determine if the index has a stronger correlation with survival than each of the individual components.
A retrospective review of patients with left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia between 2004 and 2010 was conducted. Ten prenatal parameters of the CDH-CPI were collected, total score was tabulated, and patients stratified according to total score and survival.
Sixty-four patients with a prenatal diagnosis of left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia were identified. Patients with a CDH-CPI score of 8 or higher had a significantly higher survival than patients with a CDH-CPI score of lower than 8. The CDH-CPI has the strongest correlation with survival compared with the individual parameters measured. The CDH-CPI correlates with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use, and 75% of patients with a score of 5 or lower were placed on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.
The CDH-CPI accurately stratifies survival in left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The amalgamation of 10 prenatal parameters of the CDH-CPI may be a better prenatal predictor than any single prognostic variable currently used.

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