Article

Investigation of the feasibility of a simple method for verifying the motion of a binary multileaf collimator synchronized with the rotation of the gantry for helical tomotherapy.

Division of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics (Impact Factor: 0.96). 01/2012; 13(1):3700.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In this paper, we suggest a new method for verifying the motion of a binary multileaf collimator (MLC) in helical tomotherapy. For this we used a combination of a cylindrical scintillator and a general-purpose camcorder. The camcorder records the light from the scintillator following photon irradiation, which we use to track the motion of the binary MLC. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of this method as a binary MLC quality assurance (QA) tool. First, the verification was performed using a simple binary MLC pattern with a constant leaf open time; secondly, verification using the binary MLC pattern used in a clinical setting was also performed. Sinograms of simple binary MLC patterns, in which leaves that were open were detected as "open" from the measured light, define the sensitivity which, in this case, was 1.000. On the other hand, the specificity, which gives the fraction of closed leaves detected as "closed", was 0.919. The leaf open error identified by our method was -1.3 ± 7.5%. The 68.6% of observed leaves were performed within ± 3% relative error. The leaf open error was expressed by the relative errors calculated on the sinogram. In the clinical binary MLC pattern, the sensitivity and specificity were 0.994 and 0.997, respectively. The measurement could be performed with -3.4 ± 8.0% leaf open error. The 77.5% of observed leaves were performed within ± 3% relative error. With this method, we can easily verify the motion of the binary MLC, and the measurement unit developed was found to be an effective QA tool.

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