Article

Forsyth AD, Valdiserri RO. Reaping the prevention benefits of highly active antiretroviral treatment: policy implications of HIV Prevention Trials Network 052

Office of HIV/AIDS Policy, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington DC, USA.
Current opinion in HIV and AIDS (Impact Factor: 4.39). 03/2012; 7(2):111-6. DOI: 10.1097/COH.0b013e32834fcff6
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This review explores the policy implications of findings from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN 052) treatment as prevention (TasP) study.
To date, the potential of antiretrovirals to prevent sexual transmission of HIV by infected persons has been grounded in observational cohort, ecological, mathematical modeling, and meta-analytic studies. HPTN 052 represents the first randomized controlled trial to test the secondary prevention benefit of HIV transmission using antiretroviral treatment in largely asymptomatic persons with high CD4 cell counts.
The US National HIV/AIDS Strategy has among its key goals the reduction of incident HIV infections, improved access to quality care and associated outcomes, and the reduction in HIV-associated health disparities and inequities. HPTN 052 demonstrates that providing TasP, in combination with other effective prevention strategies offers the promise of achieving these life-saving goals. But HPTN 052 also highlights the need for cautious optimism and underscores the importance of addressing current gaps in the HIV prevention, treatment, and care continuum in order for 'TasP' strategies to achieve their full potential. Among these are necessary improvements in the capacity to expand HIV testing, facilitate effective linkage and retention in care, and improve treatment initiation, maintenance, and virus suppression.

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