Plasma Cytokine Profiles at Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Department of Paediatrics, The Queen Silvia's Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Göteborg, Sweden.
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (Impact Factor: 0.9). 03/2012; 34(4):271-5. DOI: 10.1097/MPH.0b013e3182431e02
Source: PubMed


Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) has been associated with elevated levels of inflammatory and immune-regulating cytokines, and polymorphisms in the genes encoding interleukin (IL)-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α have been associated with increased incidence of certain subtypes of NHL. The aim of the present study was to screen for a broader spectrum of growth factors and inflammatory mediators and to compare the profiles in different subtypes of NHL in pediatric patients. Serum samples were collected at diagnosis from 31 pediatric patients diagnosed with NHL admitted at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, between 1995 and 2008. Cytokines and growth factors were measured in serum using the Luminex platform by application of a 30-plex kit. Levels of IL-6, IL-2R, IL-10, TNF-RI, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α were significantly higher in patients with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma compared with patients diagnosed with B-cell lymphomas and lymphoblastic lymphomas. High levels of IL-4, IL-13, TNF-RI, and epidermal growth factor were associated with a poorer general condition at diagnosis. The present study suggests that NHL subgrouping and the general condition of pediatric patients at diagnosis are associated with plasma levels of growth factors and inflammatory mediators at presentation.

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