Article

Personal Omics Profiling Reveals Dynamic Molecular and Medical Phenotypes

Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
Cell (Impact Factor: 33.12). 03/2012; 148(6):1293-307. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2012.02.009
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Personalized medicine is expected to benefit from combining genomic information with regular monitoring of physiological states by multiple high-throughput methods. Here, we present an integrative personal omics profile (iPOP), an analysis that combines genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and autoantibody profiles from a single individual over a 14 month period. Our iPOP analysis revealed various medical risks, including type 2 diabetes. It also uncovered extensive, dynamic changes in diverse molecular components and biological pathways across healthy and diseased conditions. Extremely high-coverage genomic and transcriptomic data, which provide the basis of our iPOP, revealed extensive heteroallelic changes during healthy and diseased states and an unexpected RNA editing mechanism. This study demonstrates that longitudinal iPOP can be used to interpret healthy and diseased states by connecting genomic information with additional dynamic omics activity.

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