Article

Metformin for treatment of antipsychotic-induced weight gain: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

Department of Psychiatry, the First Hospital of China Medical University, 155# Nanjing North Road, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, PR China.
Schizophrenia Research (Impact Factor: 4.59). 03/2012; 138(1):54-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.schres.2012.02.021
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To evaluate the efficacy of metformin for treatment of antipsychotic-induced weight gain.
Seventy-two patients with first-episode schizophrenia who gained more than 7% of their predrug weight were randomly assigned to receive 1000 mg/d of metformin or placebo in addition to their ongoing treatment for 12 weeks using a double-blind study design. The primary outcome was change in body weight. The secondary outcomes included changes in body mass index, fasting glucose and insulin, and insulin resistance index.
Of the 72 patients who were randomly assigned, 66 (91.6%) completed treatments. The body weight, body mass index, fasting insulin and insulin resistance index decreased significantly in the metformin group, but increased in the placebo group during the 12-week follow-up period. Significantly more patients in the metformin group lost their baseline weight by more than 7%, which was the cutoff for clinically meaningful weight loss. Metformin was tolerated well by majority patients.
Metformin was effective and safe in attenuating antipsychotic-induced weight gain and insulin resistance in first-episode schizophrenia patients. Patients displayed good adherence to metformin.

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