Conference Paper

Reflections on the long-term use of an experimental digital signage system.

DOI: 10.1145/2030112.2030132 Conference: UbiComp 2011: Ubiquitous Computing, 13th International Conference, UbiComp 2011, Beijing, China, September 17-21, 2011, Proceedings
Source: DBLP

ABSTRACT In this paper we reflect on our long-term experiences of developing, deploying and supporting an experimental digital signage system. Existing public display systems almost always feature a single point of control that is responsible for scheduling content for presentation on the network and provide sophisticated mechanisms for controlling play-out timing and relative ordering. Our experiences suggest that such complex feature-sets are unnecessary in many cases and may be counter productive in signage systems. We describe an alternative, simpler paradigm for encouraging widespread use of signage systems based on shared 'content channels' between content providers and display owners. Our system has been in continuous use for approximately 3 years. We reflect and draw lessons from how our user community has adopted and used the resulting public display network. We believe that these reflections will be of benefit to future developers of ubiquitous display networks.

0 Followers
 · 
61 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The proliferation of public displays, along with ubiquitous wireless communication and sensing technology, has made it possible to create a novel public communication medium: open networked pervasive displays would allow citizens to provide their own content, appropriate close-by displays, and increase their own awareness of a display's surroundings and its local communities. We envision that such displays can create interacting places, i. e., public spaces that promote community interaction and place awareness. In this paper we describe our Interacting Places Framework (IPF), a conceptual framework for designing applications in this novel research space that we developed based on four distinct public display studies. Our IPF focuses on 4 elements: 1) content providers, i. e., entities that will supply content; 2) content viewers, i. e., people who are addressed by the content; 3) communication channels that deliver the content and range from inclusive, i. e., open-for-everyone, to exclusive, i. e., closed-group channels; and 4) an awareness diffusion layer that describes how community awareness building happens both explicitly, i. e., through content tailored towards a specific audience, and implicitly, by observing output for other people.
  • Source
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A field study on the dynamics of acceptance and rejection of public displays in a knowledge work environment is presented. This study has been conducted on the premises of a research center that employs more than 400 people. We report the motivations for the deployment of a public display infrastructure by the Communication Office, and present the results of the field study conducted 18 months after the initial installations. The results showed that there were several limitations for addressing the information needs of employees through the public displays. The main reasons being they were not properly situated in the everyday lifecycle of the institute, and the visual layout was somehow confusing and often ineffective. However, one of the main design goals was the address the need to propose a new corporate identity after a recent company restructuring. This was communicated more effectively even if not generally accepted. Starting from these results, we proposed two main design strategies to make the deployment of public display systems more effective in terms of perceived usefulness and acceptance: (1) seamless integration of the public display into the everyday life of the community and (2) active involvement of the members of the community in the creation and diffusion of content.
    Proceedings of the 2012 International Symposium on Pervasive Displays; 06/2012