Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Jen-Chuen Hsieh, Feb 25, 2014
0 Followers
 · 
72 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper we investigate the use of a temporal extension of independent component analysis (ICA) for the discrimination of three mental tasks for asynchronous EEG-based brain computer interface systems. ICA is most commonly used with EEG for artifact identification with little work on the use of ICA for direct discrimination of different types of EEG signals. In a recent work we have shown that, by viewing ICA as a generative model, we can use Bayes' rule to form a classifier obtaining state-of-the-art results when compared to more traditional methods based on using temporal features as inputs to off-the-shelf classifiers. However, in that model no assumption on the temporal nature of the independent components was made. In this work we model the hidden components with an autoregressive process in order to investigate whether temporal information can bring any advantage in terms of discrimination of spontaneous mental tasks
    Neural Engineering, 2005. Conference Proceedings. 2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on; 04/2005
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This thesis explores latent-variable probabilistic models for the analysis and classification of electroenchephalographic (EEG) signals used in Brain Computer Interface (BCI) systems. The first part of the thesis focuses on the use of probabilistic methods for classification. We begin with comparing performance between 'black-box' generative and discriminative approaches. In order to take potential advantage of the temporal nature of the EEG, we use two temporal models: the standard generative hidden Markov model, and the discriminative input-output hidden Markov model. For this latter model, we introduce a novel 'apposite' training algorithm which is of particular benefit for the type of training sequences that we use. We also asses the advantage of using these temporal probabilistic models compared with their static alternatives. We then investigate the incorporation of more specific prior information about the physical nature of EEG signals into the model structure. In particular, a common successful assumption in EEG research is that signals are generated by a linear mixing of independent sources in the brain and other external components. Such domain knowledge is conveniently introduced by using a generative model, and leads to a generative form of Independent Components Analysis (gICA). We analyze whether or not this approach is advantageous in terms of performance compared to a more standard discriminative approach, which uses domain knowledge by extracting relevant features which are subsequently fed into classifiers. The user of a BCI system may have more than one way to perform a particular mental task. Furthermore, the physiological and psychological conditions may change from one recording session and/or day to another. As a consequence, the corresponding EEG signals may change significantly. As a first attempt to deal with this effect, we use a mixture of gICA in which the EEG signal is split into different regimes, each regime corresponding to a potentially different realization of the same mental task. An arguable limitation of the gICA model is the fact that the temporal nature of the EEG signal is not taken into account. Therefore, we analyze an extension in which each hidden component is modeled with an autoregressive process. The second part of the thesis focuses on analyzing the EEG signal and, in particular, on extracting independent dynamical processes from multiple channels. In BCI research, such a decomposition technique can be applied, for example, to denoise EEG signals from artifacts and to analyze the source generators in the brain, thereby aiding the visualization and interpretation of the mental state. In order to do this, we introduce a specially constrained form of the linear Gaussian state-space model which satisfies several properties, such as flexibility in the specification of the number of recovered independent processes and the possibility to obtain processes in particular frequency ranges. We then discuss an extension of this model to the case in which we don't know a priori the correct number of hidden processes which have generated the observed time-series and the prior knowledge about their frequency content is not precise. This is achieved using an approximate variational Bayesian analysis. The resulting model can automatically determine the number and appropriate complexity of the underlying dynamics, with a preference for the simplest solution, and estimates processes with preferential spectral properties. An important contribution from our work is a novel 'sequential' algorithm for performing smoothed inference, which is numerically stable and simpler than others previously published. Riassunto Questa tesi esplora l'utilizzo di modelli probabilistici a variabili nascoste per l'analisi e la classificazione dei segnali elettroencefalografici (EEG) usati in sistemi Brain Computer Interface (BCI). La prima parte della tesi esplora l'utilizzo di modelli probabilistici per la classificazione. Iniziamo con l'analizzare la differenza tra modelli generativi e discriminativi. Allo scopo di tenere in considerazione la natura temporale del segnale EEG, utilizziamo due modelli dinamici: il modello generativo hidden Markov model e il modello discriminativo input-output hidden Markov model. Per quest'ultimo modello, introduciamo un nuovo algoritmo di apprendimento che è di particolare beneficio per il tipo di sequenze EEG utilizzate. Analizziamo inoltre il vantaggio nell'utilizzare questi modelli dinamici verso i loro equivalenti statici. In seguito, analizziamo l'introduzione di informazione più specifica circa la struttura del segnale EEG. In particolare, un'assunzione comune nell'ambito di ricerca relativa al segnale EEG è il fatto che il segnale sia generato da una trasformazione lineare di sorgenti indipendenti nel cervello e altre componenti esterne. Questa informazione è introdotta nella struttura di un modello generativo e conduce ad una forma generativa di Independent Component Analysis (gICA) che viene utillizzata direttamente per classificare il segnale. Questo modello viene confrontato con un approccio discriminativo più comunemente usato, in cui dal segnale EEG viene estratta informazione rilevante successivamente donata ad un classificatore. All'inizio, gli utilizzatori di un sistema BCI possono avere molteplici modi realizzare uno stato mentale. Inoltre le condizione psicologiche e fisiologiche possono cambiare da una sessione di registrazione all'altra e da un giorno all'altro. Di conseguenza, il segnale EEG corrispondente può variare sensibilmente. Come primo tentativo di risolvere questo problema, utilizziamo una mistura di modelli gICA in cui il segnale EEG è suddiviso in diversi regimi, ognuno dei quali corrisponde ad un diverso modo di realizzare uno stato mentale. Potenzialmente, un limite del modello gICA è il fatto che la natura temporale del segnale EEG non è presa in considerazione. Di conseguenza, analizziamo un'estensione di questo modello in cui ogni componente indipendente viene modellata utilizzanto un modello autoregressivo. Il resto della tesi concerne l'analisi dei segnali EEG e, in particolare, l'estrazione di processi dinamici indipendenti da più elettrodi. Nel campo di ricerca sul BCI, un tale metodo di decomposizione ha varie possibili applicazioni. In particolare, può essere utilizzato per rimuovere artefatti dal segnale, per analizzare le sorgenti nel cervello e in definitiva per aiutare la visualizzazione e l'interpretazione del segnale. Introduciamo una forma particolare di linear Gaussian state-space model che soddisfa varie proprietà, come la possibilità di specificare un numero arbitrario di processi indipendenti e la possibilità di ottenere processi in particolari bande di frequenza. Discutiamo poi un'estensione di questo modello per il caso in cui non conosciamo a priori il numero corretto di processi che hanno generato la serie temporale e la conoscenza circa il loro contenuto di frequenza non è precisa. Quest'estensione è fatta utilizzando un'analisi di Bayes. Il modello che ne deriva può automaticamente determinare il numero e la complessità della dinamica nascosta, con una preferenza per la soluzione più semplice, ed è in grado di trovare processi indipendenti con particolare contenuto di frequenza. Un contributo importante in questo lavoro è lo sviluppo di un nuovo algoritmo per realizzare l'inferenza che è numericamente stabile e più semplice che altri presenti in letteratura.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper a novel approach for independent component analysis (ICA) model order estimation of movement electroencephalogram (EEG) signals is described. The application is targeted to the brain-computer interface (BCI) EEG preprocessing. The previous work has shown that it is possible to decompose EEG into movement-related and non-movement-related independent components (ICs). The selection of only movement related ICs might lead to BCI EEG classification score increasing. The real number of the independent sources in the brain is an important parameter of the preprocessing step. Previously, we used principal component analysis (PCA) for estimation of the number of the independent sources. However, PCA estimates only the number of uncorrelated and not independent components ignoring the higher-order signal statistics. In this work, we use another approach - selection of highly correlated ICs from several ICA runs. The ICA model order estimation is done at significance level α = 0.05 and the model order is less or more dependent on ICA algorithm and its parameters.