Conference Paper

Water distribution network real-time simulation based on SCADA system using OPC communication.

DOI: 10.1109/ICNSC.2011.5874916 Conference: Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Networking, Sensing and Control, ICNSC 2011, Delft, The Netherlands, 11-13 April 2011
Source: DBLP

ABSTRACT Hydraulic simulation models of water distribution networks (WDN) are routinely used for operational investigations and network design purposes. However, their full potential is often never realized because in the majority of cases, they have been calibrated with data collected manually from the field during a single historic time period and reflects the network operational conditions that were prevalent at that time. They were then applied as part of a reactive investigation. An urban water distribution network real time simulation system based on SCADA system using OPC (object linking and Embedding(OLE) for Process control) communication was built in this paper. In order to make real-time simulation of water distribution network, the real-time data was collected every 15 minutes, the real time data were received and sent into water distribution network simulation model by OPC communication of SCADA system. The real-time data included total head of reservoir, flow rate, pressure, pump operation information. The real-time simulation system can give timely warning of changes for normal network operation, providing capacity to minimize customer impact and comparing the simulation results with the real-time data collected. The real time simulation system of urban water distribution network solved the problem of data input and user interaction compare to traditional network model. It offers a way for the development of intelligent water network.

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