Conference Paper

Person Identification using Shadow Analysis.

DOI: 10.5244/C.24.35 Conference: British Machine Vision Conference, BMVC 2010, Aberystwyth, UK, August 31 - September 3, 2010. Proceedings
Source: DBLP
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Available from: Ryo Kurazume, Jun 30, 2015
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