Conference Paper

Mutual Adaptation in a Prosthetics Application.

Conference: Ad-Hoc, Mobile, and Wireless Networks, Second International Conference, ADHOC-NOW 2003 Montreal, Canada, October 8-10, 2003, Proceedings
Source: DBLP
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