Conference Paper

The Role of Schema Matching in Large Enterprises.

In proceeding of: CIDR 2009, Fourth Biennial Conference on Innovative Data Systems Research, Asilomar, CA, USA, January 4-7, 2009, Online Proceedings
Source: DBLP
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