Conference Paper

Towards Automatic Personalized Content Generation for Platform Games.

Conference: Proceedings of the Sixth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment, AIIDE 2010, October 11-13, 2010, Stanford, California, USA
Source: DBLP
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