Article

Modified collaborative coefficient: a new measure for quantifying the degree of research collaboration.

Scientometrics (Impact Factor: 2.27). 01/2010; 84:365-371. DOI: 10.1007/s11192-009-0100-4
Source: DBLP

ABSTRACT Collaborative coefficient (CC) is a measure of collaboration in research, that reflects both the mean number of authors per
paper as well as the proportion of multi-authored papers. Although it lies between the values 0 and 1, and is 0 for a collection
of purely single-authored papers, it is not 1 for the case where all papers are maximally authored, i.e., every publication
in the collection has all authors in the collection as co-authors. We propose a simple modification of CC, which we call modified
collaboration coefficient (or MCC, for short), which improves its performance in this respect.

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