Article

Towards autonomous vehicular clouds.

ICST Trans. Mobile Communications Applications 01/2011; 11:e2.
Source: DBLP
0 1
 · 
2 Bookmarks
 · 
152 Views
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Inter-vehicle communication systems are a new paradigm of networking. Largely related to mobile ad hoc networks and their distributed, self-organizing structure, they also introduce new threats. In order to assess these threats we introduce a model of attacks on an inter-vehicle communication system in this paper. This model is used to re-fine the system model of the NoW communication system and to find potential weaknesses during the specification phase of the NoW communication system. Our work shows that there are several interesting new challenges requiring novel solutions, some of which are out-lined at the end of this paper. Although this is still work in progress, it is the foundation for analysis and assessment of future work. As one of the main results of this paper, we identified sev-eral difficult to detect attacks on the hard-and software, and on the sensor input. We further point out system require-ments to thwart such attacks.
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the context of vehicular ad-hoc networks (VANETs), a number of highly promising convenience applications have been proposed. These include collecting and distributing information on the traffic situation, distributed monitoring of road and weather conditions, and finding available parking places in a distributed, cooperative manner. Unfortunately, all of these applications face major prob- lems when a VANET is used as a means to distribute the required information. In particular a large number of vehicles needs to be equipped with dedicated VANET technology before these applica- tions can provide a useful service. Even if customers were willing to purchase a system which is not immediately useful, it would still take quite some time until the required density of equipped cars is reached. In contrast, affordable always-on mobile Internet ac- cess is already mainstream. Such Internet connectivity could be used to build the proposed applications in a different fashion: by using peer-to-peer communication, essentially creating a peer-to- peer network of cars sharing traffic information. This allows to overcome the limitations of VANETs, while it preserves their key benefits of decentralization and robustness. In this paper, we de- scribe the technical challenges that arise from such an approach, point out relevant research directions, and outline possible starting points for solutions.
    Proceedings of the 13th Annual International Conference on Mobile Computing and Networking, MOBICOM 2007, Montréal, Québec, Canada, September 9-14, 2007; 01/2007
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cabernet is a system for delivering data to and from moving vehicles using open 802.11 (WiFi) access points encountered opportunis- tically during travel. Using open WiFi access from the road can be challenging. Network connectivity in Cabernet is both fleeting (access points are typically within range for a few seconds) and intermittent (because the access points do not provide continuous coverage), and suffers from high packet loss rates over the wireless channel. On the positive side, WiFi data transfers, when available, can occur at broadband speeds. In this paper, we introduce two new components for improving open WiFi data delivery to moving vehicles: The first, QuickWiFi, is a streamlined client-side process to establish end-to-end connectivity, reducing mean connection time to less than 400 ms, from over 10 seconds when using standard wireless networking software. The second part, CTP, is a transport protocol that distinguishes conges- tion on the wired portion of the path from losses over the wireless link, resulting in a 2 throughput improvement over TCP. To char- acterize the amount of open WiFi capacity available to vehicular users, we deployed Cabernet on a fleet of 10 taxis in the Boston area. The long-term average transfer rate achieved was approximately 38 Mbytes/hour per car (86 kbit/s), making Cabernet a viable system for a number of non-interactive applications.
    Proceedings of the 14th Annual International Conference on Mobile Computing and Networking, MOBICOM 2008, San Francisco, California, USA, September 14-19, 2008; 01/2008

Full-text

View
23 Downloads
Available from
Oct 15, 2013