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    • "Assessment of relationship between ages, health status and infection level was carried out by comparing prevalence of Babesia spp. in different cattle and water buffalos populations. In consistence with previous studies, aged animal was associated with increased prevalence (Sukanto et al., 1993; Terkawi et al., 2012) and fever in cattle had a strong relationship with the occurrence of Babesia infection (Safieldin et al., 2010). Using ELISA, the seroprevalence of both parasites in aged cattle (13.75% and 12.5% for B. bigemina and B. bovis, respectively) was significantly higher than in the younger (7.04% and 4% for B. bigemina and B. bovis, respectively). "
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    ABSTRACT: In order to determine the molecular and serological prevalence of Babesia bigemina and Babesia bovis, a total of 247 blood samples were collected from cattle and water buffalos in Beheira and Faiyum Provinces in Egypt and examined by nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In cattle, the prevalence of B. bigemina and B. bovis was 5.30% and 3.97% by nPCR and 10.60% and 9.27% by ELISA, respectively, whereas those of water buffalos were 10.42% and 4.17% by nPCR and 15.63% and 11.46% by ELISA, respectively. Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of the two infections were observed on the basis of age and health status. Sequencing analysis revealed two genotypes for B. bovis spherical body protein-4. In conclusion, the current data provide valuable information regarding the epidemiology of B. bigemina and B. bovis infections in cattle and water buffalos from Egypt, which can be employed in developing future strategies for disease management and control.
    Veterinary Parasitology 09/2013; 198(1-2). DOI:10.1016/j.vetpar.2013.08.028 · 2.55 Impact Factor
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    • "Using IFAT, the present study revealed an infection rate of 15.82 % (25/158) for Babesia sp. This finding was in accordance with that obtained by Terkawi et al. (2012), who examined a herd of cattle in the central region of Syria using IFAT and found infection rates of 18.36 and 21.74 % for B. bovis and B. bigemina, respectively. Moreover, Jaffar et al. (2010) in Dubai, UAE recorded infection rates of 10.5 and 33.3 % for equine babesiosis and theileriosis. "
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    ABSTRACT: Bovine piroplasmosis is caused by tick-borne hemoprotozoans of the genera Babesia and Theileria and is the most prevalent in tropical and subtropical countries, causing a major economic impact worldwide. In the current study, a total of 405 cattle of different ages, sexes, and breeds were randomly sampled for surveying and diagnosis of babesiosis and theileriosis using three methods: direct microscopy (blood smears), indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Giemsastained blood smears revealed that, out of 405 examined cattle, 33 (8.15 %) were infected with Babesia sp. and 65 (16.05 %) with Theileria sp. (total number of infected cattle was 98). Mixed infection was seen in 11 (2.72 %) animals. Moreover, application of the three diagnostic assays on 158 randomly sampled cattle indicated that 17 (10.76 %) and 33 (20.89 %) were positive for Babesia and Theileria spp. by the direct smear technique, 25 (15.82 %) and 33 (20.89 %) by IFAT (fluorescence was greenish yellow for Babesia and yellowish for Theileria), and 20 (12.66 %) and 38 (24.05 %) by PCR. Using primers specific for Babesia and Theileria spp., we found that diagnostic bands appeared at ~350 and ~370 bp, respectively indicating the presence of these piroplasms. Statistically, there was a non-significant difference of the positivity in response to the three techniques; thus, any of these methods can be described as useful for diagnosing blood parasites in both domesticated animals and birds. On the basis of the obtained results, it could be concluded that direct microscopy can be used in acute infections, whereas IFAT and PCR are useful in chronicity.
    Parasitology Research 05/2012; · 2.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bovine piroplasmosis is caused by tick-borne hemoprotozoans of the genera Babesia and Theileria and is the most prevalent in tropical and subtropical countries, causing a major economic impact worldwide. In the current study, a total of 405 cattle of different ages, sexes, and breeds were randomly sampled for surveying and diagnosis of babesiosis and theileriosis using three methods: direct microscopy (blood smears), indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Giemsa-stained blood smears revealed that, out of 405 examined cattle, 33 (8.15 %) were infected with Babesia sp. and 65 (16.05 %) with Theileria sp. (total number of infected cattle was 98). Mixed infection was seen in 11 (2.72 %) animals. Moreover, application of the three diagnostic assays on 158 randomly sampled cattle indicated that 17 (10.76 %) and 33 (20.89 %) were positive for Babesia and Theileria spp. by the direct smear technique, 25 (15.82 %) and 33 (20.89 %) by IFAT (fluorescence was greenish yellow for Babesia and yellowish for Theileria), and 20 (12.66 %) and 38 (24.05 %) by PCR. Using primers specific for Babesia and Theileria spp., we found that diagnostic bands appeared at ~350 and ~370 bp, respectively indicating the presence of these piroplasms. Statistically, there was a non-significant difference of the positivity in response to the three techniques; thus, any of these methods can be described as useful for diagnosing blood parasites in both domesticated animals and birds. On the basis of the obtained results, it could be concluded that direct microscopy can be used in acute infections, whereas IFAT and PCR are useful in chronicity.
    Parasitology Research 04/2012; 111(3):1019-24. DOI:10.1007/s00436-012-2926-6 · 2.33 Impact Factor
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