Article

Control of nonmuscle myosins by phosphorylation.

Department of Developmental Biology , Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, United States
Annual Review of Biochemistry (Impact Factor: 26.53). 02/1992; 61:721-59. DOI: 10.1146/annurev.bi.61.070192.003445
Source: PubMed
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