Article

Inhibited Spontaneous Emission in Solid-State Physics and Electronics

Physical Review Letters (Impact Factor: 7.73). 01/1987; 58:2059-2062. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.58.2059

ABSTRACT It has been recognized for some time that the spontaneous emission by atoms is not necessarily a fixed and immutable property of the coupling between matter and space, but that it can be controlled by modification of the properties of the radiation field. This is equally true in the solid state, where spontaneous emission plays a fundamental role in limiting the performance of semiconductor lasers, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and solar cells. If a three-dimensionally periodic dielectric structure has an electromagnetic band gap which overlaps the electronic band edge, then spontaneous emission can be rigorously forbidden.

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