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    ABSTRACT: Most of the ~50 blazars detected to date at TeV energies (E>0.1 TeV) are high-frequency-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs). Only a handful episodic TeV detections of low- and intermediate-frequency-peaked BL Lacs (LBL/IBLs, with synchrotron peak frequencies in the infrared and optical regime) have been reported, typically during high-flux states. The VERITAS array, a ground-based TeV observatory located in southern Arizona has observed five known TeV LBL/IBLs since 2009: 3C 66A, W Comae, PKS 1424+240, S5 0716+714 and BL Lacertae, with at least 5-10 hours/year, which so far resulted in the detection of a bright, sub-hour timescale gamma-ray flare of BL Lacertae in June 2011. We also report the detection and characterization of two new IBLs: VER J0521+211 and B2 1215+30.
    The European Physical Journal Conferences 10/2013; 61. DOI:10.1051/epjconf/20136104012
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    ABSTRACT: The $\gamma$-ray spectrum of the low-frequency-peaked BL Lac (LBL) object AP Librae is studied, following the discovery of very-high-energy (VHE; $E>100\,{\rm GeV}$) $\gamma$-ray emission up to the TeV range by the H.E.S.S. experiment. This makes AP Librae one of the few VHE emitters of the LBL type. The measured spectrum yields a flux of $(8.8 \pm 1.5_{\rm stat} \pm 1.8_{\rm sys}) \times 10^{-12}\ {\rm cm}^{-2} {\rm s}^{-1}$ above 130 GeV and a spectral index of $\Gamma = 2.65\pm0.19_{\rm stat}\pm0.20_{\rm sys}$. This study also makes use of \textit{Fermi}-LAT, observations in the high energy (HE, E$>$100 MeV) range, providing the longest continuous light curve (5 years) ever published on this source. The source underwent a flaring event between MJD 56306-56376 in the HE range, with a flux increase of a factor 3.5 in the 14-day bin light curve and no significant variation in spectral shape with respect to the low-flux state. While the H.E.S.S., and (low state) \textit{Fermi}-LAT fluxes are in good agreement where they overlap, a spectral curvature between the steep VHE spectrum and the \textit{Fermi}-LAT, spectrum is observed. The maximum of the $\gamma$-ray emission in the spectral energy distribution is located below the GeV energy range.
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    ABSTRACT: S5 0716+714 is a typical BL Lacertae object. In this paper we present the analysis and results of long term simultaneous observations in the radio, near-infrared, optical, X-ray and $\gamma$-ray bands, together with our own photometric observations for this source. The light curves show that the variability amplitudes in $\gamma$-ray and optical bands are larger than those in the hard X-ray and radio bands and that the spectral energy distribution (SED) peaks move to shorter wavelengths when the source becomes brighter, which are similar to other blazars, i.e., more variable at wavelengths shorter than the SED peak frequencies. Analysis shows that the characteristic variability timescales in the 14.5 GHz, the optical, the X-ray, and the $\gamma$-ray bands are comparable to each other. The variations of the hard X-ray and 14.5 GHz emissions are correlated with zero-lag, so are the V band and $\gamma$-ray variations, which are consistent with the leptonic models. Coincidences of $\gamma$-ray and optical flares with a dramatic change of the optical polarization are detected. Hadronic models do not have the same nature explanation for these observations as the leptonic models. A strong optical flare correlating a $\gamma$-ray flare whose peak flux is lower than the average flux is detected. Leptonic model can explain this variability phenomenon through simultaneous SED modeling. Different leptonic models are distinguished by average SED modeling. The synchrotron plus synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model is ruled out due to the extreme input parameters. Scattering of external seed photons, such as the hot dust or broad line region emission, and the SSC process are probably both needed to explain the $\gamma$-ray emission of S5 0716+714.
    The Astrophysical Journal 01/2014; 783(2). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/783/2/83 · 6.28 Impact Factor

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