Article

Jasminum grandiflorum Linn (Chameli): Ethnobotany, Phytochemistry and Pharmacology – A review

Pharmacologyonline 2 newsletter 2009; 586-595. Volume 2, (May- August 2009) (057). ISSN No. 1827-8620 01/2009; 2:586-595.

ABSTRACT Summary
Jasminum grandiflorum Linn (Chameli / Yasmin; Oleaceae) is native to Tropical and warm Temperate regions and cultivated in France, Italy, China, Japan, India, Morocco and Egypt. The plant is documented to possess beneficial effects as odontalgic, thermogenic, aphrodisiac, antiseptic, emollient, anthelmintic, deobstruant, suppurative, tonic, in fixing loose teeth, ulcerative stomatitis, leprosy, skin diseases, ottorrhoea, otalgia, wounds, corns and aromatherapy. Pharmacological activities of the plant reported so far are spasmolytic, antiinflammatory, anti-microbial, antioxidant, antiulcer, cytoprotective, chemoprotective, wound healing and anti-acne activity. The present review is an attempt to highlight the various ethnobotanical and traditional uses as well as phytochemical and pharmacological activities reported so far from J. grandiflorum.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Sandeep Sachan, Aug 19, 2015

Click to see the full-text of:

Article: Jasminum grandiflorum Linn (Chameli): Ethnobotany, Phytochemistry and Pharmacology – A review

200.26 KB

See full-text
8 Followers
 · 
4,788 Views
  • Source
    • "However, G. sempervirens is a toxic plant whose roots are the only material used in homoeopathy [3] [4]. Its chemical composition mainly includes indole alkaloids, but also iridoids, sterols and coumarins [4], while in J. grandiflorum secoiridoids [5], iridoids, flavonoids, phenolic acids and terpenes have been identified [2]. Thus, the purpose of this study was to perform a systematic characterization of the phenolic composition of J. grandiflorum by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS n in order to find a fingerprint for authenticity of this species. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The dried flower buds of Jasminum grandiflorum L. are widely consumed as infusion and used in traditional medicine for psychiatric disorders. It is important to have a well-established method for the chemical characterization of J. grandiflorum since there are resemblances with a toxic species, Gelsemium sempervirens (L.) Jaume Saint-Hilaire. HPLC-DAD-ESI/MSn analysis allowed identifying six phenolic compounds for the first time. Moreover, the evaluation of in vitro activity against central nervous system (CNS) related enzymes was undertaken for the first time, as well as against reactive species in order to support the efficacy towards CNS disorders.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis 01/2014; 88:157. · 2.83 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The dried flower buds of Jasminum grandiflorum L. are widely consumed as infusion and used in traditional medicine for psychiatric disorders. It is important to have a well-established method for the chemical characterization of J. grandiflorum since there are resemblances with a toxic species, Gelsemium sempervirens (L.) Jaume Saint-Hilaire. HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n) analysis allowed identifying six phenolic compounds for the first time. Moreover, the evaluation of in vitro activity against central nervous system (CNS) related enzymes was undertaken for the first time, as well as against reactive species in order to support the efficacy towards CNS disorders.
    Journal of pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis 01/2014; 88C:157-161. DOI:10.1016/j.jpba.2013.08.040 · 2.83 Impact Factor