Chapter

El desafío de evaluar familias desde un enfoque eco-sistémico: nuevos aportes a la validez y confiabilidad de la Escala NCFAS

In book: Familia y Diversidad, Publisher: Fundación San José para la Adopción, Editors: Ladislao Lira, pp.95-126.
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Using a theory of change framework, this study examines outcome measures of a home visitation program that provided services to first-born children and their parents living in southwestern New Mexico. Method: Home visitation workers conducted pretest and posttest assessments for prenatal and postpartum periods for 109 families receiving services in the First-Born Program. Families were assessed using the Revised North Carolina Family Assessment Scale. Paired sample t tests were used to assess effect. Results: Clients participating in the First-Born Program displayed significantly higher posttest scores on measures of family resiliency. Specifically, clients demonstrated improved scores in operationalized measures of resilience: social support, caregiver characteristics, family interaction measures, and a reduction in personal problems affecting parenting. Conclusion: The results are promising as participants were observed to make positive improvements in specific areas related to family resiliency.
    Research on Social Work Practice 09/2005; 15(5):323-338. · 1.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined outcome measures of a home-visitation program that provided services to first-born children and their parents. Home-visitation workers conducted pretest-posttest assessments for prenatal and postpartum periods for 109 families. Families were assessed using the Revised North Carolina Family Assessment Scale. Paired sample t tests were used to assess effect. Ordinary least squares regression measured effect of increased home-visitation services on family well-being. In this study, program participants displayed significantly higher posttest scores on social support, caregiver characteristics, family interaction measures, and a reduction in personal problems affecting parenting. Improved scores were significantly related to increased numbers of home-visitation services. The results are promising as participants were observed to make positive improvements in family resiliency.
    Family & community health 32(1):58-75. · 0.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Longitudinal growth patterns of internalizing and externalizing behavior problems were examined in a community sample of 441 children across the ages of 2 to 5 using hierarchical linear modeling. Contextual risk was measured using five indicators (socioeconomic status, marital status, number of siblings, parent stress, parent psychopathology), and three levels of child resilience (biological, behavioral, and relational) were also assessed. Results indicate that a general pattern of decline in both types of behavior problems was observed for the entire sample across time, although considerable individual variability in this pattern was observed. Children's externalizing and internalizing behavior at age 5 was predicted by the level of risk at age 2. All three child resilience factors were also predictive of externalizing and internalizing behaviors at age 5. In the prediction of the slope of problem behavior over time, risk status interacted with both temperamental fearlessness and a mutually responsive orientation with the mother to predict the decline in externalizing and internalizing problem behavior. Results underscore the complex interactions of risk and multiple levels of resilience that are implicated in the maintenance of problem behavior over time. They highlight the importance of considering whether expected resilience factors operate similarly across different levels of risk.
    Development and Psychopathology 02/2007; 19(3):675-700. · 4.40 Impact Factor

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May 22, 2014