Article

Diclofenac induced immune thrombocytopenia.

Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
The Journal of Rheumatology (Impact Factor: 3.17). 11/1990; 17(10):1403-4.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We describe a patient with scleroderma who developed immune thrombocytopenia secondary to diclofenac on 2 occasions. Platelet count returned to normal with cessation of diclofenac and institution of prednisone.

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