Article

Gastric emptying in patients with fundal gastritis and gastric cancer.

Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Centre for Adult Diseases, Osaka, Japan.
Gut (Impact Factor: 13.32). 08/1990; 31(7):767-9. DOI: 10.1136/gut.31.7.767
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Gastric emptying was compared in patients with gastric cancers and fundal gastritis to determine its value in identifying patients at high risk of gastric cancer. Gastric emptying was measured by the acetaminophen absorption method, and the extent of fundal gastritis was determined by the endoscopic Congo red test. The results showed that gastric emptying was significantly slower in patients with severe fundal gastritis than in those without. Gastric emptying in patients with differentiated adenocarcinomas was significantly slower than in those with undifferentiated adenocarcinoma, its value being similar to that in patients with severe fundal gastritis. The Congo red test showed that the incidence of severe fundal gastritis was significantly greater in patients with differentiated adenocarcinomas than in those with undifferentiated cancers. These findings suggest that delayed gastric emptying may allow prolonged contact between dietary carcinogens and the stomach.

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