Article

Suicide by electrocution.

Dept. of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka.
Medicine, science, and the law (Impact Factor: 0.48). 08/1990; 30(3):219-20. DOI: 10.1177/002580249003000309
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Electrocution is a rare mode of suicide. In Sri Lanka, where the suicide rate is extremely high, ingestion of liquid pesticides is the commonest method used. The case of a 34-year-old labourer of the Electricity Board, who committed suicide using 220-240 volt domestic electricity supply is described. He had been suffering from a depressive illness for some time. Suicide by electrocution has not been documented in Sri Lanka before.

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