Salmonella Neck Abscess

Department of Surgery, Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, MD.
Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (Impact Factor: 2.33). 02/1990; 116(1):88-91. DOI: 10.1001/archotol.1990.01870010092025
Source: PubMed


Salmonella species represent uncommon causative agents in focal infections of the head and neck. The case of a 24-year-old diabetic man with a neck abscess caused by Salmonella enteritidis is presented, and the relevant literature is reviewed. Salmonella should be included in the differential diagnosis of head and neck abscesses.

Download full-text


Available from: Alan H Shikani, Feb 18, 2015

  • The Journal of the Association of Physicians of India 09/1996; 44(8):563-4.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article describes a rare case of Salmonella neck abscess complicated by internal jugular vein thrombosis in a 51-year-old patient with previously undiagnosed diabetes. The patient was discharged without any complications after a combination of medical and surgical treatment. Also discussed here are the clinical manifestations, imaging findings, and spontaneous resolution of the internal jugular vein thrombosis. Being immunocompromised is a critical predisposing factor for Salmonella neck abscess. Patient recovery is largely determined by proper incision, drainage of pus and adequate intravenous antibiotics according to bacterial sensitivity tests. Detection of an internal jugular vein thrombosis does not signify a poor prognosis. Spontaneous resolution of thrombosis is encountered after treating the infection.
    The Journal of Laryngology & Otology 01/2000; 113(12):1122-4. DOI:10.1017/S0022215100158086 · 0.67 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Infection of the neck is a common clinical problem in all age groups, especially children and young adults. The clinical symptoms and signs are often suggestive of the diagnosis. Imaging studies including CT and MR imaging are frequently required to confirm the diagnosis but more importantly to localize the infectious process and search for and delineate an abscess cavity. Ultrasound has also been used in the evaluation of superficial neck infections, especially to determine fluid accumulation. Conventional films consisting of an anteroposterior and lateral view were the examination before the introduction of CT in 1972. Conventional films can still be used for a preliminary survey, especially of the retropharyngeal space when there is a question of a retropharyngeal phlegmon or abscess.
    Radiologic Clinics of North America 10/2000; 38(5):941-68, ix. DOI:10.1016/S0033-8389(05)70214-1 · 1.98 Impact Factor
Show more