A double blind study of 2 mg versus 4 mg nicotine-gum in an industrial setting

Laboratoire d'Epidemiologie et de Medecine Sociale, Ecole de Sante Publique, Campus Erasme, Route de Lennik 808, 1070 Bruxelles, Belgium
Journal of Psychosomatic Research (Impact Factor: 2.74). 02/1987; 31(2):171-6. DOI: 10.1016/0022-3999(87)90073-0
Source: PubMed


In a double blind randomised trial to aid smoking cessation a 2 mg nicotine gum (n = 101) was compared with a 4 mg gum (n = 98), in smokers of at least 15 cigarettes/day. The trial involved blue and white collar workers and took place at their working place (industrial setting). Intervention during the one year follow-up period was minimal. At 3 months 36.2% of the 2 mg nicotine gum group reported to have stopped smoking, against 44.8% in the 4 mg group (non-significant difference). At one year in the 2 and 4 mg groups respectively 22.3 and 32.2% reported smoking abstinence (non significant difference). However in a sub-group with a higher nicotine-dependence score, only 18.5% were abstainers at one year in the 2 mg nicotine gum group against 32.9% in the 4 mg nicotine gum, which is a significant difference at the p = 0.05 level. This is however a post-hoc finding and should be taken with caution.

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