Article

Conceptual review of the hepatic vascular bed

Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Hepatology (Impact Factor: 11.19). 09/1987; 7(5):952-63. DOI: 10.1002/hep.1840070527
Source: PubMed
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