Article

A gradient of bicoid protein in Drosophila embryos.

Max-Planck-Institut für Entwicklungsbiologie, Abteilung III Genetik, Tübingen, Federal Republic of Germany.
Cell (Impact Factor: 33.12). 08/1988; 54(1):83-93. DOI: 10.1016/0092-8674(88)90182-1
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The maternal gene bicoid (bcd) organizes anterior development in Drosophila. Its mRNA is localized at the anterior tip of the oocyte and early embryo. Antibodies raised against bcd fusion proteins recognize a 55-57 kd doublet band in Western blots of extracts of 0-4 hr old embryos. This protein is absent or reduced in embryonic extracts of nine of the 11 bcd alleles. The protein is concentrated in the nuclei of cleavage stage embryos. It cannot be detected in oocytes, indicating temporal control of bcd mRNA translation. The bcd protein is distributed in an exponential concentration gradient with a maximum at the anterior tip, reaching background levels in the posterior third of the embryo. The gradient is probably generated by diffusion from the local mRNA source and dispersed degradation.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
134 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In pattern-forming developmental systems, cells commonly interpret graded input signals, known as morphogens. Morphogens often pattern tissues through cascades of sequential gene expression steps. Such a multi-tiered structure appears to constitute suboptimal use of the positional information provided by the input morphogen because noise is added at each tier. However, the conventional theory neglects the role of the format in which information is encoded. We argue that the relevant performance measure is not solely the amount of information carried by the morphogen, but the amount of information that can be accessed by the downstream network. We demonstrate that quantifying the information that is accessible to the system naturally explains the prevalence of multi-tiered network architectures as a consequence of the noise inherent to the control of gene expression. We support our argument with empirical observations from patterning along the major body axis of the fruit fly embryo.
    01/2015;
  • Source
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In pattern-forming developmental systems, cells commonly interpret graded input signals, known as morphogens. Morphogens often pattern tissues through cascades of sequential gene expression steps. Such a multi-tiered structure appears to constitute suboptimal use of the positional informa-tion provided by the input morphogen because noise is added at each tier. However, the conventional theory neglects the role of the format in which information is encoded. We argue that the relevant performance measure is not solely the amount of information carried by the morphogen, but the amount of information that can be accessed by the downstream network. We demonstrate that quantifying the information that is accessible to the system naturally explains the prevalence of multi-tiered network architectures as a consequence of the noise inherent to the control of gene expression. We support our argument with empirical observations from patterning along the major body axis of the fruit fly embryo.
    arXiv:1501.07342. 01/2015;

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
66 Downloads
Available from
May 16, 2014