Article

Compliance with a Dietary Manipulation Programme in Families with Infants Prone to Atopy

Department of Paediatrics, University Central Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
Acta paediatrica (Impact Factor: 1.77). 08/1988; 77(4):563-8. DOI: 10.1111/j.1651-2227.1988.tb10701.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The success of familial compliance with a dietary manipulation programme was studied prospectively in 91 newborn babies from atopic families for up to 12 months. The control group consisted of 72 infants from non-atopic families. The percentages of infants breast-fed at the age of six months were 58% and 38% in the study group and control group, respectively. The introduction of cow's milk based formulas was postponed until the age of three months in 63% of the infants in the study group and 47% of the infants in the control group. Solid food was avoided during the first three months in 76% and 45% of the infants in the study group and control group, respectively. Maternal age, smoking and low social class were associated with poor compliance. The existence of atopic dermatitis in any member of the family was associated with good compliance. The main advantages of our programme were the increased number of children breast-fed until the age of six months, and the reduced number of infants introduced to cow's milk based formulas or solid food before three months of age.

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    • "This study is the ®rst report to explore the causal relationship between predictors and adherence to treatment advice in AD. Only a few previous studies have referred to compliance matters in the treatment of AD (Poysa et al, 1988; Witkowski, 1988; Katzenberg and Hollander, 1989; Broberg et al, 1990; LoPresti, 1992; Fischer, 1996). We suppose one of the reasons for this is that there are no established and universally agreed treatment protocols for AD. "
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