Article

A Measurement of Newton's Gravitational Constant

Physical Review D (Impact Factor: 4.86). 10/2006; DOI: 10.1103/PHYSREVD.74.082001
Source: arXiv

ABSTRACT A precision measurement of the gravitational constant $G$ has been made using a beam balance. Special attention has been given to determining the calibration, the effect of a possible nonlinearity of the balance and the zero-point variation of the balance. The equipment, the measurements and the analysis are described in detail. The value obtained for G is 6.674252(109)(54) 10^{-11} m3 kg-1 s-2. The relative statistical and systematic uncertainties of this result are 16.3 10^{-6} and 8.1 10^{-6}, respectively.

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