Article

Kidney disorders and hematotoxicity from organic solvent exposure.

Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health (Impact Factor: 3.1). 02/1985; 11 Suppl 1:83-90.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Short-term exposure to certain solvents, such as several halogenated hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates, ethylene glycol, ethylene glycol ethers, and diethylene glycol, may cause renal tubular necrosis. Tubular lesions with metabolic acidosis have been reported in addicts inhaling solvent vapor (eg, toluene). A Goodpasture's syndrome may be induced by acute or subacute exposure to solvents, but its incidence is rare. No adequate proof is yet available that repeated exposure to nonsubstituted organic solvents may lead to the development of different types of chronic glomerulonephritis, but the available epidemiologic data are suggestive of the existence of such an association. Only a few solvents have been reported to act on the hematopoietic system of humans. The hematotoxicity (aplastic anemia, leukemia) of benzene is well established. Some ethylene glycol ethers are also toxic to bone marrow.

0 Followers
 · 
159 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We measured urinary excretion of albumin and retinol-binding proteins to investigate the occurrence of early renal dysfunction in 45 paint workers exposed principally to toluene, and in the same number of unexposed control subjects matched individually for sex and age. Two biological indicators of personal toluene absorption, namely urine hippuric acid and o-cresol, were also measured in the exposed subjects. A significantly higher level and increased prevalence of elevated retinol-binding protein in the urine of exposed workers was found, whereas no significant difference in urinary albumin concentration was seen between the two groups. Urinary concentrations of retinol-binding protein was correlated (r = 0.399, P < 0.006) with that of o-cresol, but not with hippuric acid or employment duration. The results suggest a dose-dependent early tubular effect due to toluene exposure that might be useful for monitoring individuals exposed to toluene at work.
    International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 01/1990; 62(1):43-46. DOI:10.1007/BF00397847 · 2.20 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A cross-sectional survey of hematological parameters was carried out among 221 workers exposed to styrene in the reinforced plastics industry and 104 controls. Styrene exposure was assessed in both groups by monitoring urinary excretion of styrene metabolites (i.e. mandelic and phenylglyoxylic acids) in post-shift urinary samples collected over five consecutive days. Blood tests were performed with the same counter for all subjects. Information on factors liable to affect hematological parameters was collected from personal questionnaires completed by the workers. Urinary excretion of styrene metabolites varied from 15 to 3740 mg/g creatinine. Exposed subjects exhibited significantly lower mean values of neutrophils and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) than controls, and significantly higher mean values for monocytes and mean corpuscular volume. A dose-effect relationship was found for MCHC which decreased with urinary metabolite concentrations. These results remained statistically significant for all parameters after adjustment for age, sex, tobacco and alcohol consumption, place of residence (rural or urban) and time of blood sampling (morning or afternoon) with the exception of neutrophils whose relationship with exposure was essentially explained by smoking. These results are suggestive of a direct effect of styrene-exposure--in the range considered--on the statistical distribution of some hematological parameters.
    International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 02/1990; 62(1):11-8. DOI:10.1007/BF00397843 · 2.20 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We measured urinary excretion of albumin and retinol-binding proteins to investigate the occurrence of early renal dysfunction in 45 paint workers exposed principally to toluene, and in the same number of unexposed control subjects matched individually for sex and age. Two biological indicators of personal toluene absorption, namely urine hippuric acid and o-cresol, were also measured in the exposed subjects. A significantly higher level and increased prevalence of elevated retinol-binding protein in the urine of exposed workers was found, whereas no significant difference in urinary albumin concentration was seen between the two groups. Urinary concentrations of retinol-binding protein was correlated (r = 0.399, P less than 0.006) with that of o-cresol, but not with hippuric acid or employment duration. The results suggest a dose-dependent early tubular effect due to toluene exposure that might be useful for monitoring individuals exposed to toluene at work.
    International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 02/1990; 62(1):43-6. · 2.20 Impact Factor