Article

Oral glucose inhibits growth hormone secretion induced by human pancreatic growth hormone releasing factor 1-44 in normal man.

Clinical Endocrinology (Impact Factor: 3.35). 11/1984; 21(4):477-81.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The interaction between the inhibitory effect on growth hormone secretion of a 75 g oral glucose load and the stimulatory effect of human pancreatic growth hormone releasing factor 1-44 (hpGRF 1-44, 10 micrograms i.v.) has been studied in six normal subjects. hpGRF 1-44 alone induced a rise in growth hormone concentrations (maximum mean +/- SEM, 16.5 +/- 1.7 mU/l 15 min after injection) while growth hormone levels were suppressed by oral glucose alone (less than 1.5 mU/l from 45 to 135 min after glucose ingestion). When hpGRF 1-44 was injected 60 min after oral glucose, the growth hormone response was attenuated (maximum, 6.7 +/- 1.4 mU/l at 15 min, P less than 0.05). Increments of blood glucose within the physiological range diminish the growth hormone response to hpGRF 1-44 in normal man.

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