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Available from: Christopher G Fairburn, Aug 28, 2014
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    ABSTRACT: This study sought to determine if amount of food consumed is important in defining binge eating episodes in individuals with bulimia nervosa (BN). Women (N = 30) with DSM-IV BN (OBN) and women (N = 25) who would have met DSM-IV criteria for BN except that their binge episodes were not objectively large (SBN) were recruited from the community. Subjects completed telephone interviews and questionnaires. Results demonstrated no significant differences between women with OBN and SBN in levels of dietary restraint, disinhibition, or hunger; no significant differences in general psychopathology; and significant differences in frequency of binge/purge episodes and impulsiveness. Differences in impulsiveness remained after controlling for frequency of binge/purge episodes. These results partially validate current diagnostic criteria for bulimia nervosa and elucidate one factor, impulsiveness, that may be important in understanding objective binge episodes in bulimia nervosa.
    International Journal of Eating Disorders 04/2001; 29(3):294-301. DOI:10.1002/eat.1021 · 3.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The high prevalence of substance abuse in individuals with bulimia nervosa (BN) and the pervasive symptom substitution in many types of drug addiction suggest that a number of substances--including food--can impair an individual's self-control, even in the presence of negative consequences. Nonetheless, the neurobiological similarities between BN and drug addiction are not clearly established. This review explores how the specific eating patterns seen in BN (binge eating and purging, with intermittent dietary restriction) are particularly addictive and differentiate BN from other eating disorders and obesity. A number of peripheral and central biological aberrations seen in BN may result in altered reward sensitivity in these individuals, particularly through effects on the dopaminergic system. Neurobiological findings support the notion that BN is an addictive disorder, which has treatment implications for therapy and pharmacological manipulations.
    Journal of clinical psychopharmacology 04/2012; 32(3):376-89. DOI:10.1097/JCP.0b013e318252464f · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    British medical journal (Clinical research ed.) 04/1984; 288(6420):826-7. DOI:10.1136/bmj.288.6420.826-a