Article

Surgical repair of a dislocated superficial digital flexor tendon and fractured fibular tarsal bone in a horse.

Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (Impact Factor: 1.72). 09/1983; 183(3):332-3.
Source: PubMed
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    ABSTRACT: Case Description-A 4-month-old Standardbred colt was examined because of a fractured right calcaneus of 8 days' duration with increased distraction of the fracture fragment evident on sequential radiographs. Clinical Findings-The foal was severely lame with diffuse periarticular tarsal swelling. Radiographically, a complete, displaced long oblique fracture of the right calcaneal body was evident. Because the fracture gap was increasing with time and lameness remained severe, despite medical management, surgical repair was recommended. Treatment and Outcome-The foal was anesthetized, and minimally invasive fracture reduction and internal fixation were achieved by use of two 4.5-mm cortical screws placed in lag fashion via stab incisions over the lateral aspect of the calcaneus. External coaptation with a Robert-Jones bandage only was used after surgery. The foal recovered well and the fracture healed appropriately, but at 8 weeks following surgery, tenosynovitis of the tarsal sheath had developed. This was attributed to the tip of the distal screw encroaching on the sheath. The screw was removed under anesthesia and the tarsal sheath drained. The tenosynovitis resolved with rest and bandaging. Fourteen months after surgery, the colt was free of lameness. Clinical Relevance-Findings suggested that a minimally invasive internal fixation technique for treatment of a calcaneus fracture in horses may be successful and may be associated with decreased morbidity, compared with the use of open reduction and plate fixation.
    Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 11/2012; 241(9):1209-13. · 1.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Injuries of the calcaneal insertions of the superficial digital flexor tendon and their relationship to displacement of the tendon from the calcaneus have not previously been reported. To describe findings made on clinical cases with disruption of the calcaneal insertions of the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) including observations on their role in horses with unstable subluxation of the tendon. To describe novel surgical techniques and the results of treatment. Disruption of the calcaneal insertions of the SDFT is associated with lameness and distension of the calcaneal bursa. Unstable displacement of the SDFT from the calcaneus is a more complex injury than incomplete disruption of one of its calcaneal insertions. The case records and diagnostic images of horses with lesions involving the calcaneal insertions of the SDFT, which were confirmed by endoscopic evaluation of calcaneal bursa between 2005 and 2009, were reviewed. Results: Nineteen horses were identified including 7 that had unstable displacement of the tendon from the calcaneus. Following endoscopic surgery, 9 of 12 horses with stable tendons and 6 of 7 horses with unstable displaced SDFTs returned to work. Tearing of the calcaneal insertions of the SDFT is associated with lameness and distension of the calcaneal bursa; endoscopic removal of the torn tissue carries a good prognosis. Horses with unstable displacement of the tendon have also disruption of the tendon fibrocartilage cap. Removal of this results in stable subluxation and can return horses to athletic activity. Both lesions can be detected by preoperative ultrasonography. Tearing of the calcaneal insertions of the SDFT should be included in the differential diagnoses of lame horses with distended calcaneal bursae. Tearing of the tendon fibrocartilage cap in horses with unstable displacement of the SDFT is a plausible explanation of the clinical features of the injury and explains previously unreliable results of reconstructive surgeries. Subtotal resection is a technically demanding technique but appears to offer an improved prognosis.
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