Article

Qualitative Research: Reaching the parts other methods cannot reach: an introduction to qualitative methods in health and health services research

Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Leicester.
BMJ Clinical Research (Impact Factor: 14.09). 08/1995; 311(6996):42-5. DOI: 10.1136/bmj.311.6996.42
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Qualitative research methods have a long history in the social sciences and deserve to be an essential component in health and health services research. Qualitative and quantitative approaches to research tend to be portrayed as antithetical; the aim of this series of papers is to show the value of a range of qualitative techniques and how they can complement quantitative research.

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